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REPORT: THIRSTY U.S. ENERGY PRODUCTION ON "COLLISION COURSE" WITH CLIMATE-IMPERILED WATER SUPPLY

Coal-Fired Power, Nuclear, Natural Gas from Fracking Singled Out As Increasingly Untenable in Portions of U.S. Already Struggling With Shrinking Water Supplies; U.S. Needs to Start Planning to Take Into Account Energy Water Use ... Not Just Energy Production.

WASHINGTON, D.C. - September 12, 2013 - Industry critics of solar and wind power are quick to assert that there will be problems for renewable energy when the sun doesn't shine and the wind doesn't blow. But a new Civil Society Institute (CSI) report prepared by Synapse Energy Economics suggests that dirty energy sources - including coal-fired electric power, nuclear power, and natural gas from fracking - face an even bigger challenge: What are you going to do if the water doesn't flow?

The CSI report notes: "Currently, 97 percent of the nation's electricity comes from thermoelectric or hydroelectric generators, which rely on vast quantities of water to produce electricity ... Water is increasingly becoming a limiting factor on U.S. energy production and a key obstacle to maintaining both electricity output and public health and safety. The constraints range from insufficient water supplies to meet power plants' cooling and pollution control needs—a challenge likely to be exacerbated by climate change, population growth, and competition from other sectors—to the high costs of energy-related water contamination and thermal pollution." ... (see more below) ...

Read the Synapse Energy Economics report for the Civil Society Institute.
Read the 09.12.13 CSI news release on the report.
Watch the 09.12.13 CSI Webcast releasing the report.
Listen to the streaming audio file for the 09.12.13 Webcast.
See the statement by CSI Senior Energy Analyst Grant Smith.
See the statement by Synapse Energy Economics.



REPORT: U.S. ELECTRICAL GRID COULD BE RELIABLE WITH MUCH HIGHER LEVEL OF RENEWABLES

Scenario for 2050 With Total End of Coal, Reduced Nuclear and Natural Gas Seen as Realistic; Lights Would Stay On Even "When the Wind Doesn't Blow ... And the Sun Doesn't Shine".

WASHINGTON, D.C. - April 17, 2013 - If the U.S. ceases to burn coal, shuts down a quarter of existing nuclear reactors, and trims its use of natural gas by 2050, the resulting increased reliance on wind, solar and other renewables will not result in a less reliable electricity grid, according to a major new report prepared by Synapse Energy Economics, Inc., for the nonprofit Civil Society Institute (CSI). The new study finds that, in the envisioned 2050 with a heavy reliance on renewables, regional electricity generation supply could meet or exceed demand in 99.4 percent of hours, with load being met without imports from other regions and without turning to reserve storage. In addition, surplus power would be available to export in 8.6 percent of all hours, providing an ample safety net where needed from one region of the U.S. to the next ... (see more below) ...

Read the 04.17.13 news release here.
Read the new Synapse report for CSI here.
Read the Dr. Thomas Vitolo presentation here.
Read the Grant Smith presentation here.
Watch the Webcast news event here.
Listen to the streaming audio of the news event here.



CIVIL SOCIETY INSTITUTE STUDY: U.S. COULD ACHIEVE OVER $80 BILLION IN LOWER ENERGY COSTS BY FOCUSING ON SAFER, RENEWABLE ENERGY

WASHINGTON, D.C. - November 16, 2011 - It is a myth that switching to safe, renewable energy would mean an unreliable U.S. power supply that also is too expensive to afford. That is the major conclusion of a new Synapse Energy Economics report prepared for the nonprofit Civil Society Institute (CSI) that details a future with more energy efficiency and renewable energy and less reliance on coal and nuclear power. Titled "Toward a Sustainable Future for the U.S. Power Sector: Beyond Business as Usual 2011," new Synapse/CSI report outlines a realistic transition to a cleaner energy future that would result in a net savings of $83 billion over the next 40 years. The Synapse report also details other major benefits, including: the avoidance of tens of thousands of premature deaths due to pollution; the creation of hundreds of thousands of new jobs; sharp cuts in carbon pollution; and significant cuts in water consumption for power production.

Read the 11.16.11 Civil Society Institute news release here.
Read the 11.16.11 Synapse Energy Economics report here.
After 5 p.m. EST on 11.16.11, listen to the streaming audio of the CSI news event.
Read about the related 11.3.11 CSI national opinion survey here.